Love The Gift-Giver, Not The Gifts

Love The Gift-Giver, Not The Gifts

Our crime is the negligence of the real for the simulacra: the representation of the thing is not the thing itself, but its shadow made tangible. We reify God by diffusing his relevance into the things he has given us, and in so doing “defang” His power to transform our lives, to conform to the pattern He has set for us. We thereby strip Him of the glory only He can handle, and of which only He is deserving.

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Edenic Memory in Morris

Edenic Memory in Morris

The beauty of the garden, however idyllic, is qualified in the second stanza. What we learn is that in the garden-close, at least now, birds do not sing their songs. It is an interpretive leap, but I believe that the “thoughs” of vv. 6–8 indicate a perversion of the purity of the garden in the first stanza. This is to say that the text is not in stasis, it is moving from its exalted state to a self-reflexive criticism in search of an ill-defined Other, with the implication being that it was lost at some point.

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