Edenic Memory in Morris

Edenic Memory in Morris

The beauty of the garden, however idyllic, is qualified in the second stanza. What we learn is that in the garden-close, at least now, birds do not sing their songs. It is an interpretive leap, but I believe that the “thoughs” of vv. 6–8 indicate a perversion of the purity of the garden in the first stanza. This is to say that the text is not in stasis, it is moving from its exalted state to a self-reflexive criticism in search of an ill-defined Other, with the implication being that it was lost at some point.

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Historicity, Race, and Cultural Insensitivity

Engaging with cultural insensitivity is quite difficult, and will require the initiative of every student to expand their social networks to include individuals who represent a diversity of backgrounds and experiences. The earnest cooperation of students, faculty, staff, and administrators alike toward a comprehensive program aimed at the critical analysis of culture will be an essential step forward in improving campus climate

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Foucault & The Would-Be Drunk Drivers

To what extent can a thirty-second public service announcement (PSA) released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) marketing office reflect the modern state’s regulation of bodies and movement in time and space? Scenes from the NHTSA’s PSA can be interpreted through analytical devices derived from Foucault’s Discipline and Punish, especially his principle of modern panopticism as diffuse and omnipresent. Interpretation of imagery through this Foucauldian analytical device illustrates aspects of social reality by putting “various political techniques of the body” in dialogue with one another (Foucault 1995:26). Generally speaking, the PSA does this through its empirical manifestation of diffuse panopticism and therefore its reflection of the carceral system in the “invisible cop[s]” and through the ominous vocalized threat of “certain capture.”

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2015-16 UCLA History Undergraduate Advisory Board

2015-16 UCLA History Undergraduate Advisory Board

UCLA’s history department has been a boon to my education and my personal development. As a member of HUAB, I can tangibly express my gratitude by sharing the many departmental strengths and few areas of improvement that I've observed with appropriate administrators to actualize meaningful change on campus and ultimately to improve the daily experience of professors and students alike

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